June 21, 2014

latenight-organdonor:

Still Alive - Orchestral Arrangement.

June 20, 2014
June 19, 2014
wnycradiolab:

utnereader:

For all of your secret message writing needs.

Sweet!

wnycradiolab:

utnereader:

For all of your secret message writing needs.

Sweet!

(Source: artpixie)

June 18, 2014
expose-the-light:

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Jellyfish
1. Jellyfishes are made up of more than 95% water.
Their bodies are soft and lack a skeletal structure or outer shell. They are delicate and easily damanged. Jellyfishes require water to help support their body and if removed from their aquatic surroundings, they collapse and die.
2. Jellyfish are radially symmetrical.
Jellyfish are symmetrical about a central axis that runs through the length of their body, from the top of their bell to the ends of their tentacles. They have a top and a bottom but they lack a left and right side and as a result differ from many other types of animals (such as mammals, reptiles, fish, birds, and arthropods) which exhibit bilateral symmetry.
3. A jellyfish has a simple digestives system with only one opening.
A jellyfish takes food in through its mouth which is located on the underside if its bell. Food is digested in a sac-like structure called a coelenteron or gastrovascular cavity. Waste material is passed out through the mouth.
4. A common analogy used to describe the delicate way jellyfish pounce through the water likens the jellys’ movements to ‘a simple form of jet propulsion’.
To move forward, jellyfishes take water into their muscular bell and then squirt it out behind them, creating a jet of water that propels the jelly forward. In addition to this form of movement, jellies also drift on water currents to move.
5. Jellyfishes have no brain, no blood, and no nervous system.
Their senses are primitive and consist of a neural net, eye spots that can sense light from dark, and chemosensory pits that help them identify potential prey.
6. A jellyfishes’ body consists of three layers.
The outer layer is called the epidermis, the inner layer which lines the gastrovascular cavity is called the gastrodermis, and the middle layer consists of a thick substance called the mesoglea.
7. Thousands of nematocytes are located on the tentacles, feeding arms, and mouth of a jellyfish.
Nenatocysts consist of a capsule that holds a hollow barbed coil, a vemon sac, and chemo-sensitive trigger hairs that detect when something edible brushes against them. When potential prey brushes against the trigger hairs, the nematocytes expel the coiled barb and inject venom into the victim through the hollow thread. The venom immobilizes the prey and the jellyfish uses its oral arms to move the prey into its mouth where it is passed through to the coelenteron for digestion.
8. Jellyfish belong to the Phylum Cnidaria.
This group of animals, all radially symmetrical, includes corals, sea anemones, hydras, and jellyfish.
9. There are about 200 species of True Jellyfishes.
True Jellyfish are species belonging to the Class Scyphozoa. Examples of True Jellyfish include Moon Jellies, Mediterranean Jellyfish, Sea Nettles, Lion’s Mane Jellyfish, Blue Jellies, and many other lesser known species. The Class Cubozoa includes about 20 species not considered to be True Jellyfish. The Class Cubozoa is also referred to as box jellyfish. The most imfamous of the Cubozoa is the Sea Wasp, a creature with a deadly sting that inhabits the waters off the coast of Australia.
10. The species Craspedacusta sowerbii is sometimes referred to as the only species of freshwater jellyfish, although it is not a true jellyfish.
Craspedacusta sowerbii belongs to the Class Hydrozoa (the group of animals that includes the hydra), not the Class Scyphozoa.

expose-the-light:

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Jellyfish

1. Jellyfishes are made up of more than 95% water.

Their bodies are soft and lack a skeletal structure or outer shell. They are delicate and easily damanged. Jellyfishes require water to help support their body and if removed from their aquatic surroundings, they collapse and die.

2. Jellyfish are radially symmetrical.

Jellyfish are symmetrical about a central axis that runs through the length of their body, from the top of their bell to the ends of their tentacles. They have a top and a bottom but they lack a left and right side and as a result differ from many other types of animals (such as mammals, reptiles, fish, birds, and arthropods) which exhibit bilateral symmetry.

3. A jellyfish has a simple digestives system with only one opening.

A jellyfish takes food in through its mouth which is located on the underside if its bell. Food is digested in a sac-like structure called a coelenteron or gastrovascular cavity. Waste material is passed out through the mouth.

4. A common analogy used to describe the delicate way jellyfish pounce through the water likens the jellys’ movements to ‘a simple form of jet propulsion’.

To move forward, jellyfishes take water into their muscular bell and then squirt it out behind them, creating a jet of water that propels the jelly forward. In addition to this form of movement, jellies also drift on water currents to move.

5. Jellyfishes have no brain, no blood, and no nervous system.

Their senses are primitive and consist of a neural net, eye spots that can sense light from dark, and chemosensory pits that help them identify potential prey.

6. A jellyfishes’ body consists of three layers.

The outer layer is called the epidermis, the inner layer which lines the gastrovascular cavity is called the gastrodermis, and the middle layer consists of a thick substance called the mesoglea.

7. Thousands of nematocytes are located on the tentacles, feeding arms, and mouth of a jellyfish.

Nenatocysts consist of a capsule that holds a hollow barbed coil, a vemon sac, and chemo-sensitive trigger hairs that detect when something edible brushes against them. When potential prey brushes against the trigger hairs, the nematocytes expel the coiled barb and inject venom into the victim through the hollow thread. The venom immobilizes the prey and the jellyfish uses its oral arms to move the prey into its mouth where it is passed through to the coelenteron for digestion.

8. Jellyfish belong to the Phylum Cnidaria.

This group of animals, all radially symmetrical, includes corals, sea anemones, hydras, and jellyfish.

9. There are about 200 species of True Jellyfishes.

True Jellyfish are species belonging to the Class Scyphozoa. Examples of True Jellyfish include Moon Jellies, Mediterranean Jellyfish, Sea Nettles, Lion’s Mane Jellyfish, Blue Jellies, and many other lesser known species. The Class Cubozoa includes about 20 species not considered to be True Jellyfish. The Class Cubozoa is also referred to as box jellyfish. The most imfamous of the Cubozoa is the Sea Wasp, a creature with a deadly sting that inhabits the waters off the coast of Australia.

10. The species Craspedacusta sowerbii is sometimes referred to as the only species of freshwater jellyfish, although it is not a true jellyfish.

Craspedacusta sowerbii belongs to the Class Hydrozoa (the group of animals that includes the hydra), not the Class Scyphozoa.

(via landscapearchitecture)

June 17, 2014
clairesalcedo:

kateoplis:

Mighty Old Trees Are Perishing Fast

“It’s a worldwide problem and appears to be happening in most types of forest,” said the study’s lead author, David Lindemayer, a professor at Australian National University and an expert in landscape ecology and forest management. The research team found that big, old trees are dying at an alarmingly fast clip around the world at all latitudes – Yosemite National Park in California, the African savanna, the Brazilian rain forest, Europe and the boreal forests around the world. […]
The die-off of these 100-to-300-year-old trees raises concern, the researchers say, because they sustain biodiversity to a greater degree than many other components of the forest. “Big, old trees are not just enlarged young trees,” said Jerry F. Franklin of the University of Washington, a co-author of the study who has studied old-growth forest for 45 years. “Old trees have idiosyncratic features – a different canopy, different branch systems, a lot of cavities, thicker bark and more heartwood. They provide a lot more habitat and niches.”
Big trees also supply abundant food for numerous animals in the form of fruits, flowers, foliage and nectar, noted Bill Laurance, another co-author, from James Cook University in Australia. “Their hollows offer nests and shelter for birds and animals” and “their loss could mean extinction for such creatures,” he said. […]
The study is only the latest among many reports of how climate change and other factors are taking a severe toll on the world’s forests. British Columbia, for example, is ground zero for a giant forest die-off that is occurring across the Rockies. More than 53,000 square miles of forest there has died in the last decade. The largest previous die-off, in the 1980s, spanned 2,300 square miles. […]
A new fungal disease that is attacking Britain’s beloved ash trees has been front-page news there. It is feared that the fungus could claim more than 90 percent of Britain’s ash, as it has elsewhere in Europe.

More trees. [infographic: Michael Paukner]

clairesalcedo:

kateoplis:

Mighty Old Trees Are Perishing Fast

“It’s a worldwide problem and appears to be happening in most types of forest,” said the study’s lead author, David Lindemayer, a professor at Australian National University and an expert in landscape ecology and forest management. The research team found that big, old trees are dying at an alarmingly fast clip around the world at all latitudes – Yosemite National Park in California, the African savanna, the Brazilian rain forest, Europe and the boreal forests around the world. […]

The die-off of these 100-to-300-year-old trees raises concern, the researchers say, because they sustain biodiversity to a greater degree than many other components of the forest. “Big, old trees are not just enlarged young trees,” said Jerry F. Franklin of the University of Washington, a co-author of the study who has studied old-growth forest for 45 years. “Old trees have idiosyncratic features – a different canopy, different branch systems, a lot of cavities, thicker bark and more heartwood. They provide a lot more habitat and niches.”

Big trees also supply abundant food for numerous animals in the form of fruits, flowers, foliage and nectar, noted Bill Laurance, another co-author, from James Cook University in Australia. “Their hollows offer nests and shelter for birds and animals” and “their loss could mean extinction for such creatures,” he said. […]

The study is only the latest among many reports of how climate change and other factors are taking a severe toll on the world’s forests. British Columbia, for example, is ground zero for a giant forest die-off that is occurring across the Rockies. More than 53,000 square miles of forest there has died in the last decade. The largest previous die-off, in the 1980s, spanned 2,300 square miles. […]

A new fungal disease that is attacking Britain’s beloved ash trees has been front-page news there. It is feared that the fungus could claim more than 90 percent of Britain’s ash, as it has elsewhere in Europe.

More trees. [infographic: Michael Paukner]

(via austentatious)

June 16, 2014
Moon shadow moving across the land during solar eclipse

Moon shadow moving across the land during solar eclipse

(via the-star-stuff)

June 15, 2014
In China, for example, it’s widely believed that sitting on a seat recently warmed by someone else’s behind can give you hemorrhoids. The Brits, on the other hand, attribute hemorrhoids to sitting on cold surfaces. But sitting on that same cold concrete would lead to a different lecture from a Ukrainian mom: She’d be sure it would make you sterile. Some Peruvians are told that lingering too long in front of the fridge can cause cancer. In the Czech Republic, everyone knows that drinking water after eating fruit leads to painful bloating. Filipino kids can’t wear red when it’s stormy out, since that would attract lightning. Germans and Austrians live in mortal fear of drafts, which get blamed for everything from pneumonia to blocked arteries, so summertime commuters routinely swelter on 90-degree trains and buses rather than cracking a window through which a cooling—but lethal!—breeze might pass. In South Korea, however, the concern about ventilation is exactly the opposite. Koreans will only use electric fans if a window is cracked, because leaving a fan on in an enclosed room, it’s almost universally believed, can be fatal. The mechanism behind the threat is a little vague: Sometimes it’s said to be a lack of oxygen that kills you, sometimes it’s a chill. But either way, you won’t care. You’ll be dead.
wildrejoicingwaters:

adventurerun:

5.10.2012 Baby raccoons in our backyard

Yes! Someone brought one of my little raccoon photos back! These are great. This was great.

wildrejoicingwaters:

adventurerun:

5.10.2012 Baby raccoons in our backyard

Yes! Someone brought one of my little raccoon photos back! These are great. This was great.

fatchance:

Grand Canyon petrographs, on the Bright Angel Tail.

These beautiful images were made by semi-nomdic Archaic Period people who lived in or visited the Grand Canyon region between 6,500 BC and 300 AD. Some rock art scholars relate these paintings to the Polychrome style rock art found on the canyon’s north rim, while others assign them to a distinctive Tusayan type, unique to the south rim.

The panels are on the Bright Angel Trail just a short distance from the trailhead. This is the most traveled trail leading into the canyon; during the peak days of tourist season hundreds of people pass this point every hour. Almost none of them look up. 

Please click either photo in the set for full views. 

(via hikergirl)

June 14, 2014

14 Spectacular Basalt Formations

theworldgeography:

Basalt is a common volcanic rock formed from the rapid cooling of basaltic lava exposed at or very near the surface of our planet. Jointed basalt columns, as the most famous and most beautiful basalt formations, exists on many places on earth. These unusual columns are predominantly hexagonal in cross-section, but  basalt polygons with three to twelve or more sides can be observed. Diameter of columns varies from a few centimeters to several meters.

image

read more —>

Lookout [synmirror]

Lookout [synmirror]

vegan-yums:

~*Easy, vegan and healthy ice cream*~

  • Frozen berry and banana ice cream / Recipe
  • Easy chocolate ice cream / Recipe
  • Peach ice cream / Recipe
  • Coconut Almond Chocolate Chip Ice Cream / Recipe
  • Cake batter ice cream / Recipe
  • Easy cookie dough / Recipe

(Source: vegan-yums, via vegan-yums)

wildrejoicingwaters:

Tulip fields in the Netherlands

Sweet Jesus, the tulips. That part of the world is so neat.

(Source: aknightintarnishedarmour)