April 29, 2012
cometsmeteoroids:

Venus & ISS
The brightest planet in the solar system is reaching its peak luminosity. On April 30th, Venus will shine at astronomical magnitude -4.7. That’s 190 times brighter than a 1st magnitude star, bright enough to see in broad daylight if your eye lands right on it.
Yesterday in the Czech Republic, something drew Martin Gembec’s eye directly to Venus. His guide was the International Space Station.
“We had a nice sunny afternoon picnic here in Jablonec,” says Gembec. “In the clear blue sky overhead, the ISS went right through Venus. It was a special moment.”
No ISS? No problem. Even without a spaceship, you can find Venus by looking 40° (about four fist-widths) east of the sun. Observing tip: Stand in the shadow of a tall building. You can also wait until the sun goes down. Venus is terrifically brilliant in the western twilight.

cometsmeteoroids:

Venus & ISS

The brightest planet in the solar system is reaching its peak luminosity. On April 30th, Venus will shine at astronomical magnitude -4.7. That’s 190 times brighter than a 1st magnitude star, bright enough to see in broad daylight if your eye lands right on it.

Yesterday in the Czech Republic, something drew Martin Gembec’s eye directly to Venus. His guide was the International Space Station.

“We had a nice sunny afternoon picnic here in Jablonec,” says Gembec. “In the clear blue sky overhead, the ISS went right through Venus. It was a special moment.”

No ISS? No problem. Even without a spaceship, you can find Venus by looking 40° (about four fist-widths) east of the sun. Observing tip: Stand in the shadow of a tall building. You can also wait until the sun goes down. Venus is terrifically brilliant in the western twilight.

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